Lilly’s bamlanivimab-etesevimab combo granted emergency use for COVID-19

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) for Eli Lilly’s investigational bamlanivimab (LY-CoV555) 700 mg and etesevimab (LY-CoV016) 1400 mg together for COVID-19.

The therapy is authorised for the treatment of mild to moderate COVID-19 in patients aged 12 and older who are at high risk for progressing to severe COVID-19 and/or hospitalisation.

Bamlanivimab and etesevimab should be administered together via a single intravenous infusion as soon as possible after a positive COVID-19 test and within 10 days of symptom onset.

In addition, the FDA has authorised infusion times for bamlanivimab alone and bamlanivimab and etesevimab together to be as short as 16 or 21 minutes, respectively – a significant reduction from the previously authorized time of 60 minutes.

This decision has been made in response to feedback received from front-line nurses and doctors administering these infusions and are aimed at reducing the burden on the healthcare system.

“Bamlanivimab alone under emergency use authorization has already provided many people with an early treatment option that could prevent hospitalizations and we are excited to now add an additional therapeutic option with a similar demonstrated clinical benefit,” said Daniel Skovronsky, Lilly’s chief scientific officer and president of Lilly Research Laboratories.

“Additionally, with the risk of resistance emerging as various strains of the virus arise, bamlanivimab and etesevimab together could potentially allow efficacy against a broader range of naturally occurring SARS-CoV-2 variants as these new strains spread around the world.”

The EUA is based on Phase 3 data from the BLAZE-1 trial, which demonstrated bamlanivimab and etesevimab together reduced the risk of COVID-19 hospitalisations and death by 70%.

Additionally, the outcomes seen with bamlanivimab and etesevimab together are consistent with the reduction in risk of hospitalization or ER visits seen with bamlanivimab alone.

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