Thermo Fisher Scientific acquires viral vector manufacturing business from Novasep

Thermo Fisher Scientific has completed the €725 million acquisition of Henogen, the Belgium-based viral vector manufacturing business, from Groupe Novasep.

Novasep’s viral vector manufacturing business provides contract manufacturing services for vaccines and therapies to biotechnology companies and large biopharma customers.

With two locations in Seneffe and Gosselies, Belgium, Novasep’s viral vector business offers more than 7,000 square meters of state-of-the-art clinical and commercial manufacturing capacity.

Founded more than 20 years ago, the business has approximately 400 employees with substantial operational and technical expertise in a broad range of viral vector classes and estimated 2020 revenue of €80 million (or approximately $95 million).

“Novasep’s viral vector business is an excellent strategic fit as Thermo Fisher continues to expand its capabilities for cell and gene vaccines and therapies globally,” said Michel Lagarde, executive vice president of Thermo Fisher.

“The addition of their manufacturing capabilities in Europe complements our four development and manufacturing sites in North America.

“In addition, they bring an incredibly talented team with more than two decades of experience across a broad range of viral vectors.

“The combination will benefit our global customers seeking support and capacity in the region as well as European customers bringing new medicines to patients inside and outside of Europe.”

The business will be part of the Pharma Services business within the Laboratory Products and Services Segment.

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